NEW STUDY FINDS THE GLOBAL GENDER PAY GAP WON’T BE CLOSED UNTIL 2186

NEW STUDY FINDS THE GLOBAL GENDER PAY GAP WON’T BE CLOSED UNTIL 2186

The World Economic Forum breaks down how far we have to go in its latest Global Gender Gap report.
The pay gap between men and women is a persistent concern all over the world, but according to new findings from the World Economic Forum, we have a long way to go before we reach parity.
In its annual Global Gender Gap report, the organization found that “at the current rate of change, and given the widening economic gender gap since last year, it will not be closed for another 170 years.” That means women and men won’t be paid equally all over in the world until 2186, based on the WEF’s research.
It may be a false equivalency, but think about this: Elon Musk wants to make humans an interplanetary species starting in 2024. We can settle on another planet, but equal pay for equal work is still somehow beyond our grasp.
Ranking 144 countries, a number of factors are taken into consideration in measuring the gender gap, including the population of women’s participation in the labor force, income, literacy and education, rates of health and survival, and women’s participation in government, including how long a country has had a female head of state.
The United States isn’t terrible, but it’s not fantastic either. On the overall gender gap ranking, it comes in at number 45, behind Trinidad and Tobago, and ahead of Australia. The country is number 26 on the economic participation ranking, number one in educational attainment (along with 23 others), 62 for health and survival and 73 on the political empowerment ranking.
The top country on the list is Iceland — but it’s not immune from concerns about pay inequality. Just last week on its election day, 48 percent of Iceland’s parliament seats were filled by women. But earlier in the month, activists were protesting the country’s wage gap.
In Iceland, women earn anywhere from 14 to 18 percent less than their male co-workers, and on Oct. 24, women all over the country staged a walkout at 2:38 p.m. — leaving their jobs 14 percent earlier.
Write up by Nina Zipkin is a staff writer at Entrepreneur.com

5 INTERESTING THINGS ABOUT JAPAN’S FIRST SELF-MADE FEMALE BILLIONAIRE

5 INTERESTING THINGS ABOUT JAPAN’S FIRST SELF-MADE FEMALE BILLIONAIRE

Yoshiko Shinohara joins the list of only 26 other self-made female Asian billionaires.

 

 

Four decades after launching her business, 82-year-old Yoshiko Shinohara has been deemed Japan’s first self-made female billionaire. Shinohara initially launched staffing agency Temp Holdings in 1973 out of her one-bedroom apartment in Tokyo. From risking everything to start her company to putting her happiness first, there’s a lot to be learned from this self-made billionaire who has been on Fortune’s list of the 50 Most Powerful Women in Global Business.

1. She was willing to risk everything.
Uninspired by the jobs available to her in Japan, Shinohara moved to Europe where she was introduced to the idea of temporary jobs. Upon her return to Japan in the 1970s, Shinohana launched her own temp agency, but at the time, temping was illegal in the Asian country. Instead of changing her business idea, she chose to risk it all.

“I used to ask myself: I wonder what it’s like in jail. How big are the rooms? Is there a toilet or a window?’” she told Harvard Business Review in 2009.

2. She never intended to become a billionaire.
Unlike many self-made millionaires and billionaires, Shinohara never intended to become a member of the 1 percent. Rather, she “want[ed] to contribute to society through business,” she said. Simply put, Shinohara just wanted to make her mark on the world.

3. She put her happiness before her marriage.
Quickly after Shinohana got married, she got divorced. “I realized that I would rather not be married, that this was not the right person for me,” she told HBR. Angering her brother and mother with the divorce, Shinohana decided she needed to do more with her life than become a housewife like most other women at that time.

“After the divorce, I said, ‘I have to do something with myself.’”

4. She provided opportunity for Japanese women.
“The importance of women being able to work as well as raise children left an indelible impression,” she told Forbes Asia. After marrying and having kids, it was the norm for Japanese women to just be housewives and it was difficult or uncomfortable for them to jump back in the workforce. On top of that, there was also few opportunities for them.
Shinohara’s company addressed this issue. “Our company was able to grow by matching Japanese women’s underlying motive,” a spokesperson for the company said.

5. Hiring men saved her business.
In the beginning, the company was proud to employ only women — it seemed like an action that aligned with the core values of the company. But when she noticed a sales slump, Shinohara decided to explore the idea of hiring men.

In 1988, she asked her managers, “‘How about if we put some men in here?’ The managers said, ‘No, thank you, we don’t need any of those creatures.’” But Shinohara listened to her instincts, brought in men and immediately saw an increase in sales. She found that a balance between men and women was the backbone to her company’s success.

WHY IT’S TIME TO LEAVE YOUR JOB

WHY IT’S TIME TO LEAVE YOUR JOB

It’s a few weeks into the New Year and you’re already burned out from heavy workloads, long hours and unrelenting stress. If you’re sick of feeling like a drone going through the motions, you’re not alone.

Millions of people dream of being able to leave their jobs to do something they really love. Make this year the year that you take control of your life and leave the cubicle.

Here are the top nine reasons employees give for wanting to leave their job, start their own work-from-home business and be their own boss:

No Commute 

No commuting means spending your time in more productive ways. Dumping the commute also saves money: less vehicle maintenance, lower fuel costs and no transit expenses.

Reduce costs

Cut down on spending. You don’t have to buy an expensive wardrobe – which means less dry cleaning. Then, there are food costs. Many employees have good intentions of packing a lunch every day. But how many actually do?

Flexibility

Not being restricted to a Monday through Friday, 9-to-5 schedule means freedom. Work when you want. Set your own schedule. Work at odd hours if you want to.

Work/life balance

Is your boss demanding? Unrealistic about workloads? Constantly looking over your shoulder? Rather than work dictating your life, you call the shots. You can focus on family and the things you love while also fulfilling financial responsibilities.

Being your own boss

Do you have an entrepreneurial spirt? Do you like managing people? Working for yourself, you make the decisions. No one else is telling you what to do. You drive your business.

Less stress

Numerous studies show that work is the number one source of stress. And we all know stress negatively impacts health. Working for yourself reduces stress with a sense of independence and empowerment.

Break free from the cubicle

The benefits and comfort of working from home cannot be underestimated. You can create the environment you want, be close to family – and end thermostat temperature wars with coworkers.

Ditch the politics

Oftentimes, knowing how to play the game gets you much farther than hard work and dedication. Talent doesn’t necessarily lead to promotion. Climbing the corporate ladder and corporate politics can be exhausting and frustrating. Be your own boss.

Meaningful work

When you are your own boss, you and you alone have the opportunity to decide what your financial future holds. Do you want to just show up and collect a paycheck? Or do you want to do work that you enjoy?

Bid Farewell to Your Job 

If you dream of leaving your job behind, but have been hesitant because you’re afraid it’s not realistic or don’t know where to start, consider starting a home-based business providing call center services using the Arise Platform.

Source: womenforhire.com

AIR INDIA CREATES WOMEN-ONLY SPACE TO PREVENT HARASSMENT

AIR INDIA CREATES WOMEN-ONLY SPACE TO PREVENT HARASSMENT

The airline aims to make travel safer for female passengers after two incidents of assault this winter.

Air India, the country’s national airline, announced early this year that it will soon set aside two rows on every flight for women passengers who are traveling solo in an effort to combat harassment and sexual assault. The six seats located at the front of the planes will be offered for no additional fees.

The move from the airline comes after two incidents this winter. In December, a male passenger groped a woman seated next to him on a flight from Mumbai to Newark. In January, a flight attendant reported a male passenger who exhibited similar inappropriate behavior towards her. Both men were arrested.

The airline is following the lead of other transportation providers in India, such as buses and trains that have created female-only spaces.In recent years, there have also been a proliferation of Indian startup ride services by and for women.

In 2013, SheTaxi, a 24-hour, seven-day-a-week taxi service for women was launched in Kerala. At the beginning of last year, nearly 550 women in Mumbai got permits to be drivers of pink auto rickshaws made to safely transport female passengers. As of this fall, pink rickshaws were also available in Noida, a city about 16 miles from New Delhi.

WOMEN WON’T HAVE EQUAL NUMBERS OF BOARD SEATS UNTIL 2055, NEW STUDY FINDS

WOMEN WON’T HAVE EQUAL NUMBERS OF BOARD SEATS UNTIL 2055, NEW STUDY FINDS

The Equilar Gender Diversity Index looks at the female representation on the boards of the biggest companies in the United States.

For all the women business leaders out there, we have some good news for you. You will get equal representation on executive boards — you only have to wait 38 years. And by that time, the more than a century that has to elapse before we close the gender equity gap should just fly by.

 

Recently, Equilar, a research firm that focuses on board recruitment, put together a Gender Diversity Index and predicts that the board of directors on the Russell 3000 list — the 3000 largest companies based in the United States — will achieve parity, with a membership made up of 50 percent women and 50 percent men, by the fourth quarter of 2055.

 

Equilar has found that there has been incremental, positive progress made over the past several years. The study found that at the end of 2016, women accounted for 15.1 percent of board seats, up from 13.9 percent in 2015, and 13.2 percent in 2014.

At the end of 2016, 738 companies — roughly 25 percent of the list — had no women on their boards of directors. But this year saw 580 women directors brought on to Russell 3000 boards — 21.4 percent of all new directors, up from from 398 in 2014.

 

Going into 2017, 21 on the list had total gender parity, and 42 company boards had between 40 percent and 50 percent women. The top three companies that had the most female representation were Tootsie Roll Industries at 75 percent (three women of four directors), Connecticut Water Service, Inc., at 62.5 percent (five women of eight directors) and Williams-Sonoma, Inc. (four women of seven directors).